Speeding penalties have been increased from this week (April 24) with drivers effectively being means tested by the courts who can issue a fine of up to 150 per cent of their weekly income

 

From now speeding will be split into three categories of severity


For the most serious speeding offences drivers will get a fine of one and half times what they take home each week up to a maximum of £1,000 for speeding on a main, minor or urban road or up to £2,500 for a motorway violation.

Courts will always have the option of sending a driver to jail for the very worst cases or offering a speed awareness course instead of points for the lesser ones.

Although the headline figure of 150 per cent is the maximum, drivers straying even a little over the speed limit can still be fined half of their weekly pay.

 

 

The three bands are A, B and C which go from the most minor transgressions to C, the worst.

For example, in a 30 mph zone a Band A case would be for someone doing between 30 and 40, Band B 41 to 50 and Band C 50 or more.

The respective fines would be 50, 100 and 150 per cent of income respectively. Points or bands will still be issued with three points for the minor offences, six for the Band B and C drivers.

And police forces still have guidelines – but they are only that, not hard and fast rules – that they will allow a leeway of 10 per cent of the limit plus two mph before prosecuting. So, for example, in a 40 zone that would be four mph plus two which makes 46 mph. The reason for this is that speedometers are not always completely accurate and drivers pose more risk if their eyes are glued to the gauge instead of the road.

 

Neil Worth, road safety officer for the GEM (Guild of Experienced Motorists) said: “Illegal or inappropriate speeds remain a significant road safety problem. If more people complied with speed limits, there would be fewer deaths and injuries on our roads; it’s as simple as that. We therefore welcome the increase in fines, as we know the enforcement of speed limits plays a vital role in road safety.The new structure has been broadly welcomed by road safety campaigners who say that many lives could be saved if drivers kept to the limits. Not only does speeding reduce the amount of time and space they have to react but any consequent impact is going to be a lot more serious.

“As drivers and riders, we are all responsible for the speeds we choose. No one can tell us to break the speed limit. So we urge every driver and rider to take that responsibility seriously and to play their part in making our roads safer.”

 

 

  • The UK’s worst speeding cases:

The two worst speeders were caught at 146mph, both by Kent Police on the M25.

There were three other instances of speeds of 140mph or more being recorded; 145mph on the M6 toll road (70mph limit), 141mph on the A1 Great Ponton Northbound road (70mph limit) and 140mph on the A5 Crick Eastern Verge road (60mph limit).

But perhaps the most astounding figure was 128mph recorded on London Road, East Grinstead – a 30mph road, exceeding the limit by 98mph.

The highest figure recorded in a 50mph zone was 120mph, by Nottinghamshire Police on the A631.

And the worst speed caught on a 40mph road was 115mph on A10 Great Cambridge Road in Hertfordshire.

  • It is legal to use a speed camera detector in your car.